Home»What to See»Principal Monuments»San Ignacio de Loyola

San Ignacio de Loyola Santo Tomé el Nuevo after the expulsion of the Jesuits

This building dates back to 1623 with the acquisition by the Archbishop Diego de Guzmán of mediaeval buildings that had been refurbished in the 16th century and that belonged to the Palace of Los Dávila, built on the interior of the south side of the walls. The north front has kept a number of items (solid defence tower, geminate windows and door with a large voussoir) that show its civil origin. The Jesuits moved to the complex and changed the buildings that had been acquired into a church, school and hospice. After the expulsion of the Society of Jesus (ordered by Carlos III in 1775), the buildings were turned into the Bishop's Palace (their function today) and the church became known as Santo Tomé el Nuevo.

It has three naves finished off with apses (surprisingly facing the west). It does not have a transept, but has a dome set on scallops; the apses are not visible from the exterior.

Inside, it has a high gallery built as a tribune, which is an exceptional example in the town of Ávila. It runs along the side naves and is used as the Bishop's Archive.

The various chapels contain an interesting collection of Baroque Churrigueresque-style altarpieces.

SCHEDULE

 

ENTRY

Closed to the general public